Tag Archives: Star Wars

Top Ten: Father and Son Stories

The relationship between father and son has been the basis of storytelling as long as stories have been told. Shakespeare was rather fond of this particular riff himself, and so are the movies. I’ve always had a soft spot for these tales. In fact, the best screenplay I ever wrote, which won the BAFTA New Writers Forum in 2008, was a father/son story. It was also the most fun to write. The story of a father and son can be tragic, inspiring and often hilarious. It can take in redemption, discovery, reconciliation and ponder the age-old question of whether we are destined to become our parents.

Here are my favourite ten movies which explore these themes. Please, feel free to suggest your own. Or, indeed, any mother/daughter stories you feel resound with the same emotions. Enjoy!

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10. Frequency

It may be cheesy as hell, but there is something genuinely touching about Gregory Hoblit’s tale of a man who discovers he can talk to his dead father through a time-travelling ham radio signal. Jim Caviezel is the cop communicating with his fire-fighter father Dennis Quaid on the same radio, in the same house, 30 years apart, attempting to alter history in order to save his father’s life. Naturally, it all goes wrong before it all goes right, and despite the rather ordinary serial killer sub-plot, Frequency throws in some neat time-travel tricks as father and son work together across a generation.

Issues resolved: Dead father (twice), murdered mother, new appreciation for father’s hobby.

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9. Finding Nemo

Hey, fish are dads too. After losing his wife and all his unborn kids, save one, over-protective Marlin is relentless in his search for Nemo, his only child. Pixar have a flawless way of portraying the complexities of human emotion through the use of toys, monsters or cute animals, and they don’t disappoint here. Marlin’s single-minded pursuit of Nemo, with no thought of ever quitting or assuming the worst is something that any parent could probably relate to. Just as Nemo’s exasperation with his over-bearing father is something that any child could equally relate to.

Issues resolved: Father learning to let go, son learning to appreciate his father’s love, mutual appreciation of those with crap memories.

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8. Field of Dreams

Phil Alden Robinson’s adaptation of the novel Shoeless Joe is rooted in a father/son relationship, despite the fact that the two never interact until the closing minutes of the picture. Ray Kinsella (Kevin Costner) is an inexperienced farmer, living with his unresolved estrangement from his dead father. When he starts to hear voices telling him to remove his crop and build a baseball field, Ray begins a zig-zag journey towards reconciliation. Everyone thinks Ray is insane but, let’s face it, voices that say ‘build it and he will come’ are a lot better than those that say ‘kill them all’.

Issues resolved: Son’s resentment of his father, never playing ‘catch’, imminent bankruptcy due to the farm not actually having any farmland left.

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7. Return of the Jedi

And you thought your dad was bad. Poor old Luke Skywalker has the kind of father issues that no amount of therapy will cure. Aside from finding out that his dad is not dead, as he was told, he also has to deal with the fact that the old man is an intergalactic despot, murderer and looks like a badly boiled egg with eyes. You have to wonder if you’ll turn out the same, right? Luckily for this galaxy, Skywalker Jr. has a heart the size of a death star and is able to turn his father back to the light. Not that this brings back the countless hundreds Skywalker Sr. force strangled on a whim.

Issues resolved: Father being a psychotic mass murderer, finding out the girl you lusted after is actually your sister, the embarrassing fact that dad looks way better in black than you.

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6. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

Keen to further the character of Indiana Jones for his third outing, Spielberg and Lucas pulled off one of the casting coups of the century by securing Sean Connery to play the archaeologist’s estranged father, Henry Jones Sr. The pairing is inspired. Bookish, uptight and pompous, Henry is the polar opposite of his adventurous offspring and their bickering is thoroughly entertaining. Well aware of the irony that we all end up like our parents, Ford integrated some of Connery’s mannerisms into his performance of the older Indiana Jones in Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.

Issues resolved: A remote and inattentive father and discovering you’ve both slept with the same woman.

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5. Transamerica

Possibly the only father/son story where the father is played by a woman. Felicity Huffman is astounding as transsexual Bree, forced to bond with the son she didn’t realise she had as a prerequisite to being granted a sex-change operation. Toby, her son, has had a traumatic childhood and simply wants someone to connect to. Bree is reluctant to tell Toby the truth, instead telling him she is a Christian missionary. The developing relationship between them, though complex and difficult, is handled with such charm, honesty and wit that you cannot fail to be drawn in by them as they embark on a road trip from New York to Los Angeles. Magical.

Issues resolved: Father is almost a woman, son is a male prostitute, the list is extensive in this one.

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4. The Godfather

Essentially a father and sons story, The Godfather is almost Shakespearian in its tale of a King and his three vastly different heirs. Central to the story, however, is the relationship between Don Corleone (Marlon Brando) and his youngest son, Michael (Al Pacino). While Sonny and Fredo have followed their father into the ‘family business’, Michael shuns his father’s attentions and ambitions for him, determined to follow his own path. This, of course, makes him far more his father’s son than the others will ever be and Michael’s subsequent descent is both inevitable and tragic. Rinse and repeat with Godfather III.

Issues resolved: Resentment of father’s interference in son’s life, acceptance of inescapable destiny to inherit father’s crown.

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3. Back to the Future

Marty McFly has never really looked up to his father, a weak-willed man who, by his own admission, is ‘not very good at confrontations’. Fortunately for Marty, his crazed friend Doc Brown inadvertently gives him the opportunity to build a better dad when Marty is sent back to 1955. Befriending the teenage McFly Sr., Marty sets about trying to teach his feeble patriarch how to truly win the heart of his mother. Further incentive is added by the fact that the other options are incest or ceasing to exist. Marty chooses the easy option and George McFly discovers that, sometimes, punching someone really hard in the face is the right thing to do.

Issues resolved: Lack of respect for ineffectual father figure and threat of being erased from history.

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2. Road to Perdition

There are multiple father/son stories running through Road to Perdition. Irish gangster Michael Sullivan Sr. (Tom Hanks) is forced to flee with his eldest son after the rest of his family are murdered by Conner, the son of his boss, and surrogate father, John Rooney (Paul Newman). Aware that Michael Jr. looks up to him, Sullivan is aloof and reserved, fearing that the son will become the father. Their journey toward mutual acceptance is both warm and moving, but the relationship between Michael Sr. and John Rooney is heart-breaking, building to one of the most poetic and beautiful gunfights in modern cinema.

Issues resolved: Accepting your father for who he is and still loving him and protecting your son from all dangers, especially yourself.

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1. Big Fish

Edward Bloom (Albert Finney/Ewan McGregor) is a great teller of tall tales, much to the frustration of his son, Will (Billy Crudup), who feels he’s never really known who his father is. When Edward discovers he is dying, Will comes to see him with his pregnant wife Joséphine (Marion Cotillard). Edward tells Joséphine the seemingly outrageous story of his life from his deathbed while Will tries desperately to reconcile with his father. With flawless performances from all, Tim Burton’s Big Fish has a big heart and the final scenes, as Will comes to understand and appreciate his father for the first, and last, time are incredibly moving.

Issues resolved: That sometimes the details of the journey don’t matter as much as the destination.

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Cool Stuff I Want – Olly Moss Star Wars Posters

British designer Olly Moss has been designing alternative posters for classic movies for a few years now, as well as a host of other merchandise. At the end of 2010, however, he came up with these three smart posters for the original Star Wars trilogy. They sold on Mondo for $50 each on a limited run, so the chances of getting one now are extremely limited. Unless you want to remortgage your house and buy one on ebay, that is.

They are deceptively simple, but demand a closer inspection. Long story short, they are COOL and I thought they deserved to be seen as much as possible. You can check out Moss’s site here.

The Posters

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Top Ten: Movie Characters With Fur

So, here’s the story. While we were chatting about possible blog ideas, my friend and fellow blogger Margaret Reyes Dempsey over at Conjuring My Musechallenged me to compile a list of Top Ten: Movie Characters With Fur. After we’d finished laughing our asses off I gave it another thought and decided to accept the challenge. Why not? After all, who doesn’t appreciate a bit of fur now and then? As the English weather becomes more and more frosty, I’m starting to wish I had some fur myself. Does that make me weird?

So, without any further preamble, here are my ten favourite furry film fellows. Enjoy, add your own favourites, and if anyone has any more outlandish suggestions for future Top Ten lists, then by all means send them to me through the Contact page. I’ll consider all challenges!

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10. Dr. Cornelius

Planet of the Apes

Archaeologist, historian and mild-mannered ape. Dr. Cornelious is one of the good apes on the familiar looking planet; filled with talking apes that regard humans as a lower species to be kept in zoos and treated as slaves. Dr. Cornelious, on the other hand, regards humans as a lower species to be studied, prodded and patronised in order to prove his zany theories. The fact that he delivers his zany theories with a well-spoken, English accent can only be a good thing. Everyone knows English accents make you sound smart.

Dr. Cornelious is conservative and likes to wear his fur in a standard swept-back style, seemingly popular among the ape population. Clearly, hairdressing is not one of the trends that the apes picked up from their human counterparts, unlike clothes, guns, and gasping in awe at Charlton Heston’s sweaty manliness.

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9. Cujo

Cujo

Man’s best friend no more, Cujo is feeling a little under the weather and it’s really pissing him off. There is nothing like an inconvenient case of rabies to really screw with your doggie day, and this sickly pooch is going to take it out on anyone who happens to cross his line of sight. I mean, we all get a bit grumpy when we’re ill, right? However, we don’t all maul people to death, attack locked cars, and murder the local sheriff just because we have a bit of a sniffle. But you get out of the car and tell Cujo that. Let’s see Cesar Millan put his mojo on this canine and keep his throat attached.

Cujo is (barely) living proof that having lots of thick, lush fur doesn’t necessarily make you cute. Nor does it necessarily make people want to touch you, especially if your thick, lush fur is matted up with blood, sweat and rabid drool. Ewwww. Bad doggie!

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8. Baloo

The Jungle Book

Baloo is like a furry version of The Dude from The Big Lebowski. In the Wild Kingdom, this bear is the King of Taking it Easy. Let’s face it, he didn’t cultivate that impressive waistline by playing sports and hitting the gym every day. Baloo likes good eating, good living, and shaking his furry booty to some jungle rhythms. If this wasn’t a Disney movie, you would suspect that habitual use of recreational drugs played a big part in this guy’s life. Would you want your kid hanging out with him?

Baloo apparently has no interest in personal grooming. He gets up and goes out without a glance in the mirror. His fur is scruffy, there are a couple of loose hairs atop his head, but the guy’s got class and knows how to carry it off. The ladies love the rough look, but Baloo doesn’t seem to be interested in a relationship. His fur is ruffled enough. He’s gone, man. Solid gone.

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7. American Werewolf

An American Werewolf in London

Tourists, eh? Coming over here, turning into monsters, rampaging through our Capital city. Yep, ‘The Special Relationship’ suffers something of a setback when American backpacker David is bitten by a werewolf on the English moors. It’s not long before the poor guy realises that surviving the attack wasn’t such a blessing after all. Come the full moon and David transforms into something that looks cuddlier and cuter than any self-respecting monster should. Like Baloo with attitude. And motivation. And a serious case of the munchies. On the plus side, he gets to have sex with Jenny Agutter, thereby repairing Anglo-American relations.

As werewolves go, this one ranks among the most fluffy and endearing. I mean, look at him. If you can ignore the slavering jaws of death and evil eyes, he’s actually just a big, furry bundle of cuddles. Or is that just me?

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6. King Kong

King Kong

Who’s the Daddy? Kong! 50-ft of simian testosterone, King Kong is the man’s man. Well, the gorilla’s gorilla. Striding through the jungles of Skull Island like he owns the place, beating up anything that gets in his way, Kong is the guy you always say ‘yes’ to. Best call him Mr. Kong, just to be on the safe side. Like most men, however, he loses half his brain at the sight of a good-looking woman, falls into a trap, ends up relocating and then takes a fall. You definitely won’t see this guy wearing an ‘I ♥ NY’ T-shirt. Still, look at his face. He’s all loved-up and happy. Bless.

When it comes to square footage of fur, there’s no beating Kong. Sure, he could probably use a bath and a blow-dry, but shower gel costs are a bitch when you’re 50-ft-tall. If you can stand the smell, then nuzzling into Kong’s hairy palms can be pretty cozy.

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5. Sully

Monsters Inc.

The undisputed champion of kid scares at Monsters Inc., James ‘Sulley’ Sullivan is an idol to monsters everywhere. The screams that Sully elicits from human children provide vast amounts of energy for the city of Monstropolis. But the kids are getting harder to scare, and Sully is getting a bit tired of being scary. Underneath all that growling and snarling is a sensitive, caring ball of azure goodness. He doesn’t even care that his best friend is a green sphere with one eye. Now, that’s a 21st century kinda guy.

Let’s be clear about one thing here, Sully’s fur is gorgeous! Light, silky and impressively well-groomed, it just begs to be touched. Sully is a metrosexual monster, who clearly believes that your job shouldn’t define you and personal hygiene matters. Monsters just aren’t meant to be this inviting.

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4. Chewbacca

Star Wars

Chewbacca, ‘Chewie’ to his friends and ‘rebel scum’ to his enemies, is the ultimate best buddy. Trust me, with this Wookie looking out for you, you’re a made man. He’s loyal, fearless and, as long as you can understand Wookie, you’ll be able to share all kinds of private jokes in public. Standing over 7-ft tall, you’ll never lose him in crowds. You’re going to want this guy on your basketball team. Sometimes he’s a bit of a bad loser, but that’s a minor gripe. After all, he didn’t complain when Han Solo and Luke Skywalker got medals at the end of Star Wars, but someone apparently forgot his. I would have.

Fur, fur, everywhere. To some, Chewbacca is a ‘walking carpet’, but once you’ve had an enthusiastic embrace from this shaggy old giant, you’ll wonder how you ever did without. Once you’ve got your breath back, that is. Just remember, he’s not a bear. He’s a Wookie.

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3. Puss in Boots

Shrek 2

Dashing, elegant, charming and seething with Latin passion, Puss in Boots is everything a cat should be. And if his mix of charisma and panache doesn’t win you over, then Puss will turn on the big, dopey cat eyes and you will be powerless to resist. He’s a legendary assassin for hire and if this cat is after you then you’re in trouble. Unless, of course, you give him a belly rub. Then he’s putty. Puss is a master swordsman, horseman, singer, dancer and can lick himself in places humans can only dream about. Or is that just me again?

He’s a cat, and it’s a basic law of nature that there’s no fur like cat fur. Rich, soft, soothing and a classic ginger. Puss keeps his fur in impeccable condition with regular grooming sessions. And if you don’t like seeing him with his head shoved between his legs, don’t look. This feline scoundrel will always put cleanliness before godliness.

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2. Remy

Ratatouille

A truly inspirational figure for anyone who has dreams of rising above their given station in life. Remy is a rat with big talents and even bigger aspirations. He wants to be a chef. Sure, he could spend his life rummaging for scraps of food on the streets of Paris like the other rats, but what kind of a life is that? To Remy, food isn’t about survival. It’s about expressing your creativity, and Remy has plenty of that to go around. All he needs is a human assistant with a hat big enough to hide under. Anyone who finds rats unpleasant, or scary, needs to spend some time with Remy. Think of it as therapy. He. Is. Adorable. End of story.

For a lowly street rat, Remy’s fur is surprisingly appealing. It’s a nice shade of blue, unusual for any rodent, and has that shaggy look popular with boy bands and Brad Pitt.

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1. Gizmo

Gremlins

This little Mogwai makes the ideal Christmas present, provided you follow the rules; don’t get him wet, keep him away from bright lights and never feed him after midnight. My advice is ignore the rules, otherwise you will be making a pretty dull movie. Gizmo is smart, funny and by far the cutest thing ever to walk the Earth on cute, stumpy little legs, with cute, big ears, a cute, squeaky voice and huge, CUTE, dewy eyes. Look up ‘cute’ in the dictionary and there will probably be a picture of Gizmo. Look up ‘comma’ and there will probably be a picture of me.

Gizmo models some attractive, two-tone fur. Get him wet and you’ll see that the newly born Mogwai that pop out of his back are nothing but a ball of the stuff. Aww, he’s so cute. He’s so damn cute you can fall into a diabetic coma just looking at him.

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15 Directors Meme

I got tagged by Peter at Magic Lantern Film Blog for this Meme. The mission? Come up with 15 filmmakers that helped shape the way I look at motion pictures. These are the filmakers whose movies not only inspired (or fanned the flames of) my passion for cinema, but taught me the rich language of the genre. The education never ends, of course, which is why I love it so much.

I’m running late, due to a two week holiday, but here I am and here it is. Enjoy, discuss, mock or admire.

1. Steven Spielberg

If you were to perform some crazy chemistry experiment and dilute cinema down to its purest form you would probably end up with a Steven Spielberg movie in a test tube. You can write him off as a bubblegum filmmaker if you like, but few directors can boast such a distinctive style and absolute grasp of the visual medium as this guy can. Able to inject his work with simple human warmth or terrifying human cruelty with equal ease, Spielberg understands his audience and how to entertain them. His influence is everywhere, in a generation of talent, and his adoration for the moving image is tightly woven into every frame he shoots. Absolutely peerless.

Signature movie: Raiders of the Lost Ark

2. David Fincher

One of the most striking and unique filmmakers to emerge in the last twenty years, Fincher’s lens peers into the darkness and brings it to life. He survived the studio and star nightmare of Alien 3, picked himself up and moved from strength to strength. Unlike many of his imitators, Fincher combines style and content, making intelligent and brooding films. Innovative title sequences, dizzying camera work and stark imagery that burns itself into the mind are the hallmarks of a Fincher movie. That, and his often surprising project choices. Frankly, he’s the only director who could make me interested in seeing a movie about Facebook.

Signature movie: Fight Club

3. John Carpenter

Carpenter has waned considerably over the last twenty years, and yet I still look forward to his upcoming The Ward simply because this could be the movie where he gets his mojo back. And Carpenter with his mojo is a force to be reckoned with. With Halloween, Carpenter demonstrated a mastery of suspense that few have matched. Of all the carbon copies that followed, not one ever measured up. And they’re still trying 32 years later.

Signature movie: Halloween

4. Alfred Hitchcock

Obvious choice, of course, but how can you avoid this one? Hitchcock may or may not have been the greatest filmmaker of all time , but he was certainly one of the most inventive. Without Hitchcock there might never have been the Dolly Zoom, director cameos, the slasher movie or Brian DePalma. Hitchcock constantly came to blows with the censors and pushed the boundaries of what was acceptable, plausible and possible in filmmaking, paving the way for modern cinema.

Signature movie: Vertigo

5. Francis Ford Coppola

If you need a lesson in the pitfalls and insanity of filmmaking, look no further than the CV of Francis Ford Coppola. From the daily battles with studio execs which haunted the production of The Godfather (where Coppola was often shadowed by a replacement director in case he was fired) through the Hurculean task of getting Apocalypse Now made (a production so troubled it got its own documentary), to the single-minded madness of One From the Heart (the cost of which eventually bankrupted him), Coppola is the guy who gets what he wants on film, at any cost.

Signature movie: Apocalypse Now

6. Martin Scorsese

The little guy with the big talent, Scorsese is the director you would want as a mentor. A walking encyclopaedia of cinema, he talks with the same frenetic pace that his movies use to tell their stories. With incredibly long tracking shots, slow motion zooms, fast zooms and quick cuts, Scorsese’s camera is an extension of the man’s boundless energy and is rarely still. He is also one of the industry’s best arrangers of soundtrack music, always choosing the perfect song to complement his scene.

Signature Movie: Goodfellas

7. Ridley Scott

His style has mellowed a little of late, his movies becoming grander in scale, but early on in his career Scott was one of the most visually unique directors around, producing two of cinema’s most influential Science Fiction films. Taking a B-movie script called Star Beast, Scott added his inherent eye for design, a desire to elevate the movie beyond the B, and gave us the outstanding Alien. He followed this with Blade Runner, which set the standard for visions of the future for years to come. Design has always played an important part in Scott’s work, and it is an area in which he excels.

Signature movie: Blade Runner

8. John Hughes

As a kid developing a passion for movies in the 80s, it would have been impossible for me not to include the late John Hughes in this list. Hughes was a capable talent behind the camera, but his true strengths lay in his screenwriting, his ability to coax career-best performances from his teenage casts and the warmth he instilled into his movies. Few filmmakers before or since have possessed Hughes’ skill for representing teenage angst without falling into the more patronising traps of lesser efforts. Hughes was a man of his time, who struggled when that time was over, but he was the best at what he did.

Signature movie: The Breakfast Club

9. The Coen Brothers

From the release of Blood Simple onwards, the Coens have continually marked themselves out as true originals with a remarkable record of hits. Save for only one or two exceptions, every Coen movie has been both singular and excellent. The next Coen project is always worth looking forward to. As accomplished as screenwriters as they are as directors, you are guaranteed cracking dialogue, inspired visuals and characters that are just a little larger than life. You will also most likely get screaming fat people, repetition of a single line for comic effect and at least one speedy tracking zoom. There’s no movie quite like a Coen movie.

Signature movie: The Big Lebowski

10. Sam Raimi

Joel Coen began his career helping out on the editing of a friend’s debut movie. That movie was The Evil Dead, and the director was Sam Raimi. Made on a shoestring budget, The Evil Dead showcased the arrival of an inspired, and rather crazed, talent. Raimi delivered the kind of camerawork usually reserved for those with far more expensive equipment at their disposal, and a few of his techniques can be seen in subsequent Coen movies. However, Raimi’s anarchic style seemed a little lost in mainstream cinema until the arrival of Spider-man.

Signature movie: Evil Dead II

11. Terry Gilliam

The least seen member of the Monty Python team, Gilliam makes movies brimming with the singular and surreal imagination which was present in his Python animations. Usually working with the most meagre of budgets, allowing him to retain creative control over all his work, Gilliam has sometimes struggled to get his projects completed. However, when they are completed they have a magical style and a sensibility all their own. They usually feature characters whose imagination is too large for the world they live in, crushed by the mechanics of a clockwork society. The irony is clearly not lost on Gilliam.

Signature movie: Brazil

12. Sergio Leone

The man who made Clint Eastwood famous with his trilogy of ‘Spaghetti Westerns’, Italian director Leone took the western genre and made it look ugly. Rejecting the good guy/bad guy set-up of classic American westerns, Leone’s contributions were simply filled with varying shades of bad guy. Even Eastwood’s ‘Man with No Name’ is merely the best of a corrupt bunch. The characters are unwashed, morally vacant and greedy, the landscapes unforgiving and barren. Leone’s frontier is a harsh place to be. Often utilising both extreme close-ups and haunting long-shots, Leone has long been held by Eastwood as a major influence on his own directorial style.

Signature movie: Once Upon a Time in the West

13.  John Landis

During the 80s, Landis was responsible for some of the best comedies of the decade, including The Blues Brothers and Trading Places, but it was when he introduced horror into the mix with An American Werewolf in London that he really reached his peak. Landis made comedies that looked as good as any of the more high-brow movies, each littered with his unmistakeable trademarks (static shots of watching statues or paintings, and references to ‘see you next Wednesday’). His career tailed off toward the end of the decade, but perhaps the forthcoming Burke & Hare will be a return to form.

Signature movie: An American Werewolf in London

14. George Lucas

As a director, George Lucas is included in this list on the basis of one film, and one alone. But what a film. Star Wars changed everything. It’s impossible to gauge exactly what impact that movie had on the 7-year-old kid I was, but I know it was profound, as it was with almost every kid around my age. Star Wars was like saying hello to the wonder of cinema for the first time. We’d never seen anything like it. There were a few flashes of that directorial skill in the three prequels, but for the most part those films were engineered rather than directed and Lucas would not have made this list based on those. But for changing the way we viewed cinema, his one contribution cannot be underestimated.

Signature movie: Star Wars

15. John Lasseter and Pixar

Before Toy Story, the feature length animated movie industry was sputtering along at an uninspired pace. Disney’s output had suffered a gradual slump in both quality and popularity, boosted only by the success of The Lion King. Pixar, a computer company which was originally part of Lucasfilm, had been experimenting with computer animation for years and entered into a deal with Disney to produce three computer animated movies. Toy Story was the first, directed by John Lasseter, and the rest is history. Not only did Pixar revolutionise how movies were animated, but they also completely modernised the storytelling. Suddenly, animated movies were not just for kids, but were written with a sophistication which could appeal to all ages. Pixar kick-started animation, with other studios quick to follow suit, and they are yet to produce a bad film.

Signature movie: Toy Story

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Okay, my turn to tag. Apologies in advance if you’ve already done it and I missed it.

Cantankerous Panda at Back in the Day

Rory Dean at Above the Line

John at John of the Dead

Dan at Top 10 Films


Free Inside! (via Blah!)

Free Inside! Today was my weekly grocery shopping expedition. I use the word expedition because that’s what it sometimes feels like when you don’t drive. Lugging three bags of groceries home is good exercise. Fascinating stuff, right? Don’t worry, I am working toward my topic. It was while I was standing there in Aisle 2, perusing the boxes of cereal, that I realised something astounding; not one brand of cereal was giving away free gifts inside the boxes. Wh … Read More

via Blah!