Review: The Beaver

Starring: Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster, Anton Yelchin, Jennifer Lawrence

Director: Jodie Foster

‘You’re nothing without me, Walter. Nothing. I’m the only part of you that works.

After two years of severe depression, toy executive Walter Black retreats completely and begins communicating with his long-suffering family through a glove puppet. Meanwhile, his estranged elder son fights to avoid becoming his father.

Having been trapped in limbo for over a year, waiting for the dust to settle on Mel Gibson’s public meltdown, The Beaver is finally released into the world. And it’s hard to imagine a more fitting role for Gibson to have chosen, even if it was chosen and performed before the event.

Walter Black, so lost in a black hole from which he feels there is no escape that he is forced to hide within an alternative persona, is such a perfect fit for Gibson that it’s hard to believe that he was second choice for the part and equally hard to believe that original choice Jim Carrey could have brought half the pathos that Gibson delivers to The Beaver. With every flicker of his eyes, every hunch of his shoulders, Gibson portrays a man trapped in his own personal Hell, while still managing to mine the ridiculous premise for nuggets of comedy. Foremost in this regard is the English cockney accent Gibson utilises for the beaver puppet itself. Apparently coached by Ray Winstone, you would swear in several places that Winstone was dubbing the puppet himself, so accurate is Gibson’s delivery. It’s the ideal voice for a puppet that becomes increasingly sinister as the movie progresses.

The always excellent Foster who, like Gibson, is no stranger to acting and directing in tandem, turns in a solid performance as Walter’s exasperated wife, torn between wanting to escape her husband’s destructive condition and wanting to save him from it. Anton Yelchin is not entirely sympathetic as Walter’s teenage son, who keeps a list of similarities between himself and his father with the intention of ridding himself of each one. It’s a sub-plot that, like The Beaver itself, is weakened by skipping over the depth, never quite fulfilling its potential.

Where the movie as a whole fails is in its rather half-hearted exploration of Walter’s underlying depression, or analysis of why he chooses to disengage from himself the way he does. That he creates a persona through a glove puppet for his own rehabilitation is a fascinating conceit. It deserves to have been explored with a little more depth, rather than simply rely solely on Gibson’s nonetheless accomplished performance.

I was going to make a gag about hands in beavers but this is a family site. Sort of.

The Beaver is by no means a bad movie. Foster has an assured touch behind the camera and the movie has real heart at its core. It is also anchored by one of Gibson’s best performances, without which it would certainly have been less of a success. By turns heart-breaking, sinister and funny, rarely has an actor seemed more at home in a part. However, the titular character itself never quite manages to become more than a puppet on the end of Walter’s arm, which seems like a failing given the importance it plays.

Ultimately, The Beaver gets caught up in trying not to be too much of any one thing. Torn between the tragic and the comedic aspects of Walter’s tale, it never quite reaches the heights of either.

Rating – 3 Stars

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15 people thought reading “Review: The Beaver” would be a good idea. Stranger still, they left messages...

    1. Richard Post author

      It’s not that bad, Colin. Just misses its potential by a degree. I’d still encourage anyone to see it, though.

      Reply
  1. Colin

    Well, I finally saw it. I didn’t believe a word of it, and the secondary plotline (the son and the girl) drove me mad, but I’ve got to take my hat off to Gibson. Not sure exactly what the message of the movie was, or even the tome of it, but it gives me an excuse to put a photo of Rod Hull on my site, anyway…

    Reply
    1. Richard Post author

      Ha! I shall visit your site and pay homage to Rod Hull. :-) Gibson all but saved the movie, let’s face it.

      Reply
  2. rtm

    Great review, Richard. I’m still curious to check this one out and to see Gibson’s performance. I wouldn’t have watched it if Jim Carrey played him, it’s just be a silly slapstick thing, glad to hear this one at least has heart.

    Reply
    1. Richard Post author

      It has plenty of that, Ruth, and most of it is supplied by Gibson. I agree that Carrey would have made it a wholly different experience, and done the movie no favours.

      Reply
      1. rtm

        Hi Richard, I finally saw this one and yeah, I think it’s good that they ended up casting Gibson instead of Carell. I like Carell but he might’ve made this film too whimsical.

        Reply
  3. Castor

    Nice to hear Gibson gives a solid performance. I’m really looking forward to seeing it (on DVD) but it’s taking forever to reach Netflix. I read the script and loved it but the somewhat mixed reviews prevented from seeing it when it was in the indie theater.

    Reply
    1. Richard Post author

      I’ll be interested to know what you think, Castor. Just out of curiosity, do you read the scripts before you see the movie often? I’ve never done that.

      Reply

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